Posts for: March, 2018

By James Hutson, DDS, PC
March 29, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

You know that tooth loss hurts your appearance, speech and ability to bite and chew. Is there an alternative to those smile gaps? Good dental implantsnews! There is a wonderful tooth replacement option called the dental implant. Available from dentist Dr. James Hutson in Marietta, GA dental implants are true artificial teeth, replacing molars, incisors and literally any kind of tooth in any location in the mouth. The treatment is simple, and the results are lifelike and long-lasting. Find out more here.

The anatomy of a dental implant in Marietta

The single dental implant in Marietta has three distinct parts:

  • A titanium metal cylinder which Dr. Hutson surgically inserts into the jaw bone
  • An extension post
  • A realistic porcelain crown

Although the titanium implant is physiologically inert, human bone is attracted to it. So when your dentist places one in your jaw, the two form a bond through osseointegration.

The process begins immediately, but over time, the bond between jaw and implant strengthens even more, particularly after Dr. Hutson restores the implant with the extension post and customized crown. Dentists call dental implants "load-bearing" because of the intense forces biting and chewing exert on them and consequently exercise the jaw bone.

Qualifying for a dental implant

Many adults and older teens qualify for dental implants in Marietta. To make sure all is well, Dr. Hutson will examine your teeth and gums and take digital-rays to look at the size and density of your jaw bone. Then, the treatment can proceed with locally injected anesthetic or other sedation option as necessary.

Just one dental visit completes the simple oral surgery. When you return home, expect to wait several weeks for the implant site to heal completely.

In addition, know that the best implant candidates brush twice daily and floss every day according to American Dental Association guidelines. If you smoke, please consider a tobacco cessation program under the supervision of your family doctor. Tobacco degrades implant sites and may lead to peri-implantitis, a destructive infection similar to advanced gum disease.

Success and longevity

In more than 95 percent of cases, dental implant procedures succeed. Additionally, implants have a lifespan of up to 50 years. Implants which support bridgework and dentures boast similar success.

Fill those gaps

Dental implants from Dr. James Hutson in Marietta, GA complete, strengthen and beautify smiles. Explore your best smile with a personal consultation with Dr. Hutson and his friendly team. Call today for an appointment: (770) 424-7525.


By James Hutson, DDS, PC
March 28, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
PeriodontalProbingIncreasesAccuracyinDiagnosingGumDisease

If you’re over age 30 there’s a fifty percent chance you have periodontal (gum) disease—and you may not even know it. Without treatment this often “silent” bacterial infection could cause you to lose gum coverage, supporting bone volume or eventually your teeth.

That’s not to say there can’t be noticeable symptoms like swollen, red, bleeding or painful gums. But the surest way to know if you have gum disease, as well as how advanced it is, is to have us examine your gums with manual probing below the gum line.

Using a long metal device called a periodontal probe, we can detect if you’ve developed periodontal pockets. These are gaps created when the diseased gum’s attachment to teeth has weakened and begun to pull away. The increased void may become inflamed (swollen) and filled with infection.

During an exam we insert the probe, which has markings indicating depths in millimeters, into the naturally occurring space between tooth and gums called the sulcus. Normally, the sulcus extends only about 1-3 mm deep, so being able to probe deeper is a sign of a periodontal pocket. How deep we can probe can also tell us about the extent of the infection: if we can probe to 5 mm, you may have early to mild gum disease; 5-7 mm indicates moderate gum disease; and anything deeper is a sign of advanced disease.

Knowing periodontal pocket depth helps guide our treatment strategy. Our main goal is to remove bacterial plaque, a thin film of food particles that collects on teeth and is the main cause and continuing fuel for the infection. In mild to moderate cases this may only require the use of hand instruments called scalers to manually remove plaque from tooth surfaces.

If, however, our periodontal probing indicates deeper, advanced gum disease, we may need to include surgical procedures to access these infected areas through the gum tissue. By knowing the depth and extent of any periodontal pockets, we can determine whether or not to use these more invasive techniques.

Like many other health conditions, discovering gum disease early could help you avoid these more advanced procedures and limit the damage caused by the infection. Besides daily brushing and flossing to remove plaque and regular dental checkups, keep watch for signs of swollen or bleeding gums and contact us for an appointment as soon as possible. And be aware that if you smoke, your gums will not likely bleed or swell—that could make diagnosis more difficult.

If you would like more information on treating gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Understanding Periodontal Pockets.”


AChildsTeethGrindingisNormal-ButYouShouldStillKeepanEyeonit

When you're first startled awake in the middle of the night by a loud, gritting sound emanating from your child's room, you may have two questions: how can such a loud racket not be harmful to their teeth? And, how can they sleep through it?

While it sounds earth-shattering, teeth grinding (medically known as bruxism) is a common habit among children. It involves an involuntary grinding, clenching or rubbing of the teeth together, either during the day or during night sleep.

While certain medications or conditions could be factors, it's believed most teeth grinding arises from the immaturity of the part of the neuromuscular system that controls chewing. It's believed to trigger a night episode as the child moves from deeper to lighter stages of sleep toward waking. Older children and adults typically handle these sudden shifts without incident, but a young child's under-developed chewing response may react with grinding.

If a child's teeth are normal and healthy, teeth-grinding typically won't create any lasting damage. But because grinding does generate pressures greater than the teeth normally encounter, it can be harmful to decayed teeth or those with enamel erosion due to high acid from consumption of sports and soda drinks. And it's also a cause for concern if the habit continues into later childhood or adolescence.

To avoid these problems, it's best to keep your child's teeth as healthy as possible by practicing daily brushing and flossing, and regularly seeing a dentist for cleanings, treatments and preventive measures like topical fluoride or sealants. And be sure to limit sugar and acidic foods and drinks in their diet to protect against decay and erosion.

You can also take steps to minimize teeth grinding and its effects. Consult with your physician about any medications they're taking that might contribute to the habit. If there are psychological issues at play, seek therapy to help your child better manage their stress. Your dentist can also fashion a custom night guard worn while they sleep that will prevent their teeth from making solid contact during grinding episodes.

Most importantly, let your dentist know if your child grinds their teeth. Keeping an eye on this potentially harmful habit will help lead to appropriate actions when the time comes.

If you would like more information on teeth grinding, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “When Children Grind Their Teeth: Is the Habit of 'Bruxism' Harmful?




Dentist - Marietta
707 Whitlock Ave. SW,
Suite B22 Marietta, GA 30064
(770) 424-7525

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