Posts for: June, 2017

By James Hutson, DDS, PC
June 27, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: jaw pain   tmj  

Jaw pain when you’re eating or talking is not normal. A clicking sound in the jaw is not normal either. Both are signs that there is a jaw painpotential oral health problem that needs to be treated by a dentist. In many cases, the problem is TMJ (short for Temporomandibular disorder). Find out the various potential causes of your pain, including TMJ, and how it can be treated by Dr. James Hutson at his Marietta, GA, dental office.

The Discomfort of Jaw Pain
Jaw pain is disruptive to your everyday routine because it makes it difficult to eat and talk. Some tougher foods like steak may be impossible to chew for proper digestion when there’s too much pain in the jaw. It’s also hard to focus on your work or a conversation with someone if you’re constantly thinking about the clicking sound coming from the side of your face (common with TMJ disorders). 

Probable Causes of Jaw Pain
One National Health Interview Survey found that about 3.5 percent of men and 6.9 percent of women in the United States report pain in the jaw. There are several reasons why you may be experiencing jaw pain:

- TMJ disorder (an inflammation of the hinge that connects the upper and lower jaw)
- Poor bite positioning
- Tooth clenching and grinding
- Yelling and screaming for long periods of time, such as at a ballgame
- Fibromyalgia (a painful, nerve-related problem)

Jaw Pain Solutions
There is likely a dental solution for many of the causes of jaw pain. Here are common treatments offered at Dr. Hutson’s Marietta dentist office:

- Orthodontics if the problem is bite-related
- A crown or bridge restoration if a damaged or missing tooth is the problem
- Mouth guards to stop grinding and clenching when sleeping
- Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication to ease inflammation and pain
- Stretching exercises and ice or heat therapy

Get Jaw Pain Help
If you’re feeling jaw pain often, don’t let too much more time pass before you see Dr. Hutson at his Marietta, GA, dentist office. Call (770) 424-7525 today to schedule a TMJ jaw examination.


By James Hutson, DDS, PC
June 22, 2017
Category: Oral Health
AnyTimeAnyPlaceCamNewtonsGuidetoFlossing

When is the best time to floss your teeth: Morning? Bedtime? How about: whenever and wherever the moment feels right?

For Cam Newton, award-winning NFL quarterback for the Carolina Panthers, the answer is clearly the latter. During the third quarter of the 2016 season-opener between his team and the Denver Broncos, TV cameras focused on Newton as he sat on the bench. The 2015 MVP was clearly seen stretching a string of dental floss between his index fingers and taking care of some dental hygiene business… and thereby creating a minor storm on the internet.

Inappropriate? We don't think so. As dentists, we're always happy when someone comes along to remind people how important it is to floss. And when that person has a million-dollar smile like Cam Newton's — so much the better.

Of course, there has been a lot of discussion lately about flossing. News outlets have gleefully reported that there's a lack of hard evidence at present to show that flossing is effective. But we would like to point out that, as the saying goes, “Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.” There are a number of reasons why health care organizations like the American Dental Association (ADA) still firmly recommend daily flossing. Here are a few:

  • It's well established that when plaque is allowed to build up on teeth, tooth decay and gum disease are bound to follow.
  • A tooth brush does a good job of cleaning most tooth surfaces, but it can't reach into spaces between teeth.
  • Cleaning between teeth (interdental cleaning) has been shown to remove plaque and food debris from these hard-to-reach spaces.
  • Dental floss isn't the only method for interdental cleaning… but it is recognized by dentists as the best way, and is an excellent method for doing this at home — or anywhere else!

Whether you use dental floss or another type of interdental cleaner is up to you. But the ADA stands by its recommendations for maintaining good oral health: Brush twice a day for two minutes with fluoride toothpaste; visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and checkups; and clean between teeth once a day with an interdental cleaner like floss. It doesn't matter if you do it in your own home, or on the sidelines of an NFL game… as long as you do it!

If you would like more information about flossing and oral hygiene, contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By James Hutson, DDS, PC
June 07, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
BracesTakeAdvantageofTeethsNaturalAbilitytoMove

There are many new and exciting ways now to transform an unattractive smile into one you'll be confident to display. But not all “smile makeover” techniques are new — one in particular has been around for generations: using braces to correct crooked teeth.

Braces have improved the smiles (and also dental health) for millions of people. But as commonplace this orthodontic treatment is, it wouldn't work at all if a natural mechanism for moving teeth didn't already exist. Braces “partner” with this mechanism to move teeth to better positions.

The jawbone doesn't actually hold teeth in place — that's the job of an elastic gum tissue between the teeth and bone called the periodontal ligament. Tiny fibers extending from the ligament attach to the teeth on one side and to the bone on the other. In addition to securing them, the dynamic, moldable nature of the ligament allows teeth to move incrementally in response to forces applied against them.

To us, the teeth feel quite stationary (if they don't, that's a problem!). That's because there's sufficient length of the tooth roots that are surrounded by bone, periodontal ligament and gum tissue. But when pressure is applied against the teeth, the periodontal ligament forms both osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) and osteoclasts (bone-resorbing cells) causing the bone to remodel. This allows the teeth to move to a new position.

Braces take advantage of this in a controlled manner. The orthodontist bonds brackets to the outside face of the teeth through which they pass a thin metal wire. They attach the ends of the wire to the brackets (braces), usually on the back teeth. By using the tension placed in the wire, the orthodontist can control the gradual movement of teeth to achieve proper function and aesthetics. The orthodontist continues to monitor the treatment progress, while making periodic adjustments to the tension.

It takes time, but through this marvelous interplay between nature and dental science you'll gain a more healthy and beautiful smile.

If you would like more information on improving your smile with orthodontics, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Moving Teeth with Orthodontics.”




Dentist - Marietta
707 Whitlock Ave. SW,
Suite B22 Marietta, GA 30064
(770) 424-7525

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